Blog


7 Pieces of Content You Didn’t Notice were Ads

Yes, it’s about native advertising.
In case you’re not familiar with it, you can click here.
The following are 7 pieces of content in 2014 that you didn’t notice were ads:

1. “Orange is the New Black” on The New York Times

Blog NA 1

What:
A fictional series of women-in-prison, based on a memoir. A good example of how a native ad can look and feel like an organic piece of the publisher’s site.

Who:
Netflix

Why it works:
Well-chosen topics and well-chosen outlets.

2. “The Six Defining Traits of the Successful 21st Century Organization” on Forbes

Blog NA 2

What:
A business article that never once mentioned the brand, other than to define the CEO title in the byline and to give a link to a longer whitepaper.

Who:
Gap International

Why it works:
The article read as if it’s part of any other section of the site.

3. “How Would You Die in Game of Thrones?” on BuzzFeed

Blog NA 3

What:
A smart quiz that looks and works just like the publisher’s popular interactive feature.

Who:
Game of Thrones

Why it works:
Integration with the publisher’s well-known characteristic.

4. “Mobile-Minded” on Mashable

Blog NA 4

What:
A number of data visualizations to paint a comprehensive picture of our personal connection to our phones by highlighting different facets of the story.

Who:
Mastercard

Why it works:
Effective content format to change the brand perception from a credit card company into a tech company.

5. “First & Long” on SB Nation

Blog NA 5

What:
Video series documenting six pro football athletes crashing football practice at their old high schools and dishing some much-needed advice.

Who:
Nike

Why it works:
High level of interactivity due to the shorter “hype” clips designed to motivate any student athlete, where users can sign up for a “pep talk” from one of the six players.

6. “The Lunar Footprint” on Thrillist

Blog NA 6

What:
A 45th anniversary bash of the moon landing on Thrillist’s tech/gear site Supercompressor. The content reinforces GE as a leader in innovation and technology.

Who:
GE

Why it works:
Thrillist strategically leverages a native partnership to tell its story. GE clearly sees an opportunity to lead in the 45th anniversary of landing on the moon.

7. “Two Engineers Have Created the Perfect Doll Every Girl Should be Playing with” on Mic.com

Blog NA 7

What:
Blog stories that garnered significant social engagement, with many pieces averaging 30K social shares (most of them on Facebook).

Who:
Cole Haan

Why it works:
The brand selflessly steps aside to let people share empowering stories for the next generation of science & tech innovators.

What do you think about the above list? Do they look like ads for the audience?
What should brands do in 2015? Please share your thoughts and ideas.

 

About Dhany Nugraha

Lifelong learner. Content Composer of Communicaption. View all posts by Dhany Nugraha